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    Default About Kawasaki ..

    In around 1966 Kawasaki moved into the production of large capacity motorcycles with the release of the 650cc W1 model and a little later released two lighter versions – the 250cc A1 Samurai and 350cc A7 Avenger – which were highly popular models at the time.

    In 1969 Kawasaki’s ‘high performance’ reputation started to kick into gear with the release of the 500cc H1 model (Mach III), which was a powerful machine for the day and as such it quickly developed a hard-edged reputation. The H2 (MachIV) released in 1972 was, at 748cc, a larger and even more powerful machine whose life span was cut prematurely short due to the onset of strict emission laws in the mid 70’s. The die had been cast however, and Kawasaki had officially established itself as a high-performance brand.

    Kawasaki built on this reputation with the release of the 903cc Z1 in 1973. Affordably priced and offering outstanding performance, the Z1 was dubbed the ‘King’ and immediately developed a large following. Things only got better in 1976 as the Z1 evolved into the Z900 and later the Z1000. The late 70’s saw the introduction of some smaller Z’s, such as the ‘77 Z650, followed by the awe-inspiring Z1300 – developed with the intention of beating the opposition into the ground with pure, unbridled horsepower.

    Bigger was not necessarily better however, as was proved with the introduction of the legendary GPZ900R. Fully faired and boasting phenomenal performance, the GPZ laid the groundwork for the development of the modern day super bike.

    By the 1990’s the sports bike era was in full swing and the race to build the fastest, most powerful machines was hotter than ever. Now was the perfect time to introduce the incredibly powerful ZZR1100. Launched in 1990, the ZZR sported RAM AIR induction and established itself as the fastest production motorcycle of the day. Fast forward to the year 2000 and the release of the ZX-12R, with a very low weight and producing an astounding 176bhp, the ZX-12R quickly took over the horsepower reigns.

    Now, half a decade later, Kawasaki has cemented its position as the foremost manufacturer of no-compromise, extreme performance motorcycles with a stellar line-up including the razor-sharp ZX-6R, the rocket ship that is the ZX-10R, and the next motorcycle to re-write all the horsepower and speed records – the peerless ZX-14.

    Yes, it is indeed a good year for motorcycling.

    p.s. this history info is from Kawasaki files {MEAN 1 } ..

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    Kawasaki Motorcycle History
    At least Know Your Bike Brand !

    Kawasaki History
    The Quick Version

    Quick Guide to Kawasaki Motorcycle History




    A huge company which produces boats, trains, planes and (o yes) motorcycles. The motorcycle division is actually quite small compared to the other huge segments and was only really started to increase the value & awareness of the brand among the people. In 1960 their first motorcycle rolled of the lined a 125cc two stroke.

    Helped by the knowledge of the Meguro company which Kawasaki had taken over (Meguro was the oldest motorcycle company in Japan) the company moved into the production of big bikes around 1966. The model was called the W1 (650cc)

    The W1 wasn’t such a success because all the rival bikes were still faster, lighter and better steering. So Kawasaki developed two lighter versions A1 Samurai (250cc) and the A7 Avenger (350cc). Which ended up being a little more successful.

    In 1969 Kawasaki started to develop a name for itself with bikes with very high performance, the start was the H1 model (500cc) also known as the Mach III. However the H1 was excellent for wheelies due to its backward weight layout. It gulped a lot of fuel and had a hard core reputation. Two smaller versions were also released the S1 (250cc) and the S2 (350cc). In 1972 a bigger version of the original was produced called (surprise..) H2 or Mach IV (748cc). The production stopped when emission rules got too strict in the mid 70’s.

    Even if the H models didn’t handle well, Kawasaki developed a super bike which no other manufacturer could compete with at the time. The Z1 from 1973 was a 903cc engine but it was first planned as a 750cc engine but Kawasaki waited and improved the engine because of the Honda CB750 introduction in 1968. Z1 had a great reputation and was very popular due to the price and performance ratio. The name ‘king’ was its alias. In 1976 the Z1 became the Z900 and the engine was improved. Later the Z1000 was launched because of more engine power.


    Towards the end of the 1970’s Kawasaki developed a few smaller ‘zed’ bikes like the Z650 which was introduced in 1977. And a big ‘zed’ Z1300 which was also partly engineer as to out perform the other Japanese companies with a big, stronger, heavier bike. But Japan still had to learn that bigger wasn’t always better and the Z1300 wasn’t a big success to the company.

    Kawasaki built a nicely full fairing bike with a strong engine and an outrageous performance called the GPZ900R (908cc). It was very popular both on the race track and on the road. And it was a comfort to ride.

    The beginning of the 1990’s all the Japanese manufacturers were competing very hard in the super bike models and any advantage above the other would bring credit and success. Kawasaki stepped right up and took that credit with the development of the ZZR-R1100 (1052cc) which was launched in 1990 and became the fastest production bike for 5 years .

    The ZZR-R1100 was popular not only for it’s speed and power but the strong frame and good suspension made it a good tour motorcycle… but also very fast. In 2002 Kawasaki replaced it with the ZZR-1200. Which was design for more middle end power and better handling. And a smaller ZZR 600 had also joined the lineup of ZZR’s earlier on in the production.

    In 2000 Kawasaki had already launched an ultra super bike called the ZX-12R (1199cc). It’s pure weight, unique frame and 176 bhp was enough to blast most bikes away.

    Kawasaki had lost some of the reputation for performance by 2000 but Kawasaki president Shinichi Morita had promised that Kawasaki would be back and indeed with the arrival of the ZX-12R and the ZX-6R Kawasaki did make a nice comeback.

    The ZX-6R was already launched in 1995 but the 2003 new ZX-6R (636cc) had been truly redesigned and engineered to new aggressive fast racing machine. Kawasaki has taken much aspects from the racing technology and integrated it into this new bike. In 2003 Kawasaki also launched a street bike model called the Z1000 with a funky styling and a flexible powerful engine. Kawasaki was / is winning its power name back

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    Default MEGURO

    In 1960, Meguro Works entered into a business relationship with Kawasaki Aircraft Co.,Ltd., leading to a full merger in 1963. Therefore, although the K1 was developed and produced by Meguro, selling it was left to Kawasaki Motor Sales Co., the forerunner of Kawasaki Motorcycle Co.,Ltd. At the time, the Kawasaki engineers were so deeply engaged in the development of a 4-stroke engine for small cars that they had no time to develop anew motorcycle engine. But by the end of 1962 the four-wheel project had ended and some of these car engineers transferred to Meguro and tool over the project. There were two projects that the developers had to tackle: the SG(a single-cylinder 250cc OHV) and the K1.

    For both projects, ex-Meguro engineers kept working on the task of chassis development, while the SG and K1 engines were developed by the ex-Kawasaki engineers. Since the K models were still in the transition stage from Meguro to Kawasaki, there were many problems associated with technology transfers and maintenance. However, work proceeded at the same time on development of a successor to the K1\ the new W1. At the time, sales objectives were concentrated on receiving orders for police patrol motorcycles intended for guard duties during the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. Since there was no time to develop a new engine, or even to remodel an existing one, there was no choice but to use the K1 model as it was. However, the engineers still wanted to overcome some basic design flaws in the K1 engine. Because the sales side wanted to maintain the impressive appearance and dignified look of the K1, it was decided to remodel the engine only, and in 1965 the remodel the engine only, and in 1965 the remodeled K1 was introduced as the K2. (The changes included increased oil pump capacity, improved crankshaft bearings, etc. The Y-shape cover, the distinctive feature of the W models, was adopted at this stage.)
    However, both the K1 and K2still shared the basic weak points of the BSA A7. The K2 was exported to the US for a test in response to the expanding American market for 4-stroke motorcycles. Unfortunately, it was rejected for a lack of power.

    The answer was the W1 which was developed as a large, high-performance, 4-stroke based on the K2. With this new model, the basic problems found in the lubrication system (already improved in the K2)and the weakness in the crank's big end durability was solved by going to a built-up crank. But their was insufficient time to implement the intended changes in the valve train

    (making it an O.H.C.).As far as the frame concerned, the conventional tubular frame from the

    BSA A7 was used unchanged.



    The frame building technology that Kawasaki inherited from Meguro was the quite advanced for its time, and most f the models following the K1 adopted tube frames because they were comparatively easy to make. Even though Kawasaki had developed a 4 stroke engine much earlier, the K1,K2 and W1 were typical 4-stroke motorcycle models for their day and were, so to speak, textbook models reflecting the then-current design and production technologies.

    The W series entry into the US market was rather unsuccessful because it was too similar to the K models in basic structure and lacked a feeling or impression of being "new". The W models also mimicked too much the look of the BSA A7 for an American tastes, even though internally the engine was much improved from the BSA.



    The W1 engine featured the larger bore of the K models and included a separate primary drive and transmission. The frame welding techniques came directly from the K models. Prior to the

    W1 Kawasaki only sold 2-strokes on the US market, but with the debut of the W1 it joined Honda in becoming one of the first Japanese motorcycle manufacturers to produce 4-strokes. While Honda had produced only 4-strokes from the beginning, Kawasaki's entry into the US the market was based on predictions of increased sales for large displacement 4-strokes in the near future.

    The 624cc engine of the W1 was one of the first large-displacement Japanese motorcycles.

    However, the way motorcycles were used in America was quite different than expected and the W1 was found "unsuitable" for the American market. On the other hand, in Japan it was well received and became famous for its unique OHV vertical twin sound and individual style.




    The chronological table for the major models of the Wseries is given below

    Year Model
    Name Remarks
    1965 W1 Introduced for the first time.
    1966 W1 Sold in Japan and U.S.A.
    1967 W1SS Changes were made to the exhaust muffler structure & shape.
    W2SS Second carb added for improved performance.
    1968 W1S Introduction of the W2SS in Japanese specifications.
    W2TT Introduced to the U.S.A. as a street scrambler with dual upswept exhaust.
    1971 W1SA Shift lever moved to left side to suit Japanese specifications.
    1973 W3 Dual front disks adopted for Japanese specifications.
    1974 Production terminated.
    Last edited by MIKER; 03-02-08 at 08:36 AM.

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    What Kawasaki had to say:




    Until 1968, Kawasaki was mainly involved in developing two cycle motorcycles, although the company did have a long history of developing four cycle engines. In 1937, Meguro (merged with Kawasaki in 1963) manufactured 500cc single engines, and the engineers who developed this technology moved to Kawasaki. These engineers played a major role in developing the 650cc W series motorcycles.
    This experience provided Kawasaki with the basic skills to develop four cycle engines.In 1967 Kawasaki made a decision to develop a high-performance motorcycle which would far exceed the 650W1, the largest motorcycles in Japan that time.
    As the United States was targeted as the main market for these high performance motorcycles, the development team was sent to the U.S. where they secretly worked out a plan for the new model.
    Finally, the displacement of the new model was set at 750cc and a mock-up was completed in October 1968.
    However, Honda announced a new 750cc single-over-head-cam (SOHC) motorcycle at the
    Tokyo Motor Show held the same year. The Kawasaki management staff realized it was meaningless to come out with a similar model after Honda had already introduced theirs, so all development efforts on Kawasaki's 750cc model were stopped.

    In 1970, the Z1 (development code T103) developing project team was reunited with the best staff in all the fields joining the project. This group repeated research and experiments to develop a better .
    Kawasaki resumed U.S. market research in March of 1970 and collected customers' opinions from various sources such as random samplings of dealers and editors of major motorcycle magazines.
    Finally, the management staff concluded there was a strong market for a high-speed, eye-appealing motorcycle with enough power to use as a reliable touring model.
    Kawasaki's answer to this market was a 1,000cc class, four cycle, four cylinder model. The main requirements for the Z1 engine were high speed, high stability, and ease of dealing with pollution problems. A four cycle unit meeting these requirements would be met by strong market demand.

    The first prototype was completed in the spring of 1971. This prototype was ridden by
    American test riders with minor adjustments made step by step. In the fall of that year, the final prototype was completed and after testing, the unit was approved for mass production. The first production model was completed in February 1972, and this unit was subjected to repeated severe road testing after which all parts, including even the nuts and bolts, were examined. After reworking all weak points, the first mass-production model was built in May 1972.

    The 903cc displacement of the Z1 made it the largest motorcycle in Japan. Worldwide, it was larger than Italian Moto Guzzi 850 and comparable to Harley-Davidson 1000 and 1200.
    The specifications called for an air-cooled four-cycle four-cylinder engine with a double-over-head-cam (DOHC) mechanism.
    The DOHC was necessary to realize overall high performance from low speed to high speed range. In motorcycle markets around the world, there were only one or two other samples of this type of engine, and it was the first engine for Kawasaki to adopt this advanced valve train.


    The Z1's maximum horsepower was 82ps at 8,500rpm, 0 to 400m acceleration was 12 seconds, and the maximum speed was above 210km/h. The Z1 power was 8ps higher than the H2, and had great potential considering the average horsepower of the 1,200cc automobile was 77ps at that time.
    However, horsepower per displacement was comparatively lower than the H1 and H2 because
    Kawasaki changed their engine design policy so that the powerband was not set near the engine's limit, thereby pursuing elegance and smooth engine performance. It is also noteworthy that the Z1 engine was based on a policy to prevent pollution and was equipped with anti-air-pollution devices such as a positive crankcase ventilation system.
    The main features of the Z1 were the reliable double-cradle steel tube frame, a safe and reliable disc brake system, and ease of maintenance. Since the Z1 utilized the complicated DOHC mechanism, ease of maintenance was carefully considered at the design stage. As a result, the Z1 could be maintained without removing the engine from the body except for maintenance of crankshaft related parts.
    The Z1 style was fresh, but cool, without the look of a 900cc heavy weight machine. The style was achieved with tail-up mufflers, a light tear-drop formed fuel tank, and a slim, flowing seat.
    All Z1 parts were individually examined and tested time after time resulting in a five year development period. Five years is not a short development period for one model, although as noted earlier, development was at one time stopped altogether. In this sense, the Z1 was the Kawasaki's flagship model.

    In September 1972, the Z1 was introduced to the U.S. public, and sales started in November of that year. Since the development stage, Z1 was nicknamed "The New York Steak," and the Z1 was enthusiastically welcomed by markets as the "mouth watering motorcycle" when sales started. The suggested retail price was $1,900 and the initial sales plan called for 1,500 vehicles per month including the European markets.


    The Z1 was introduced to the Japanese public at the Tokyo Motor Show in October of 1972 and drew the strongest attention among numerous new models developed by our competitors.

    In December 1972, Kawasaki held a press conference at Tokyo Takanawa Prince Hotel and invited guests from 17 companies in the motorcycle industry, and reporters from magazines and newspapers. At the conference, a new model, the Z2, was introduced as a brother model for the Japanese market.Production of Kawasaki's 750RS Z2 started in January 1973. It was a 746cc machine with newly designed pistons and crankshaft parts to express the same feeling as the Z1. The maximum Z2 horse power was 69ps at 9,000rpm with a maximum speed of 190km/h.

    Sale of the Z2 started in March 1973 and were 10% higher than our competitors' 750cc class motorcycles. The 900cc class body size and the DOHC engine attracted Japanese riders all at once because motorcycle equipped with a DOHC engine had not existed in Japan prior to the Z2.
    During the first two years of production, Kawasaki built 80,000 Z1 and Z2 motorcycles, and the sales of these models established Kawasaki's reputation as a heavy weight motorcycle manufacturer
    Last edited by MIKER; 15-08-07 at 01:33 PM. Reason: add ; font & colour change ..

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    Default Eddie 'Ray' Lawson ..

    Eddie Ray Lawson was raised on the dusty dirt tracks of California in the mid-1970s and began road racing in the late-70s, at first of 250 Grand Prix bikes, then later on Superbikes.

    Lawson seemed destine for greatness from the very beginning, In his first AMA Superbike finish he won at Talladega in 1980. In only his second full year of Superbike racing, 1981, Lawson won the title in a close battle with rivals Freddie Spencer and Wes Cooley. Lawson became known as "Steady Eddie" for his consistent performances during the course of a season.

    Lawson came back to win his second AMA Superbike title by the slim margin of nine points over Honda's Mike Baldwin. The 1982 season was to be his final full year of racing in America. In 1983 he left to compete in the 500cc World Championship Grands Prix where he brought home four World Championships.

    Eddie Lawson will go down in history as one the greatest motorcycle road racers of all time. Lawson won the 500cc World Championship four times during the 1980s. When he retired from GP racing in the early 1990s, he ranked third on the all-time 500cc Grand Prix wins list with 31 victories.

    In addition to his international accomplishments, Lawson was equally successful on the domestic front. The Californian won the AMA Superbike Series twice (1981 and 1982) and the AMA 250 Grand Prix Series in 1980 and 1981. When inducted into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1999, Lawson was the only rider to ever win the AMA Superbike and 250GP titles during his career. Lawson also won the Daytona 200, the first time during the prime of his racing career in 1986, then again in 1993 when he returned to the event after retiring from full-time motorcycle racing.

    Lawson was born in Upland, California, on March 11, 1958. He grew up around motorcycles. Both his father and grandfather raced. Some of Lawson’s earliest memories are of going out to the desert races with his father. Lawson started riding an 80cc Yamaha when was 7 years old, having to hold the nearly full-sized bike up on his tiptoes when he came to a stop. By the time he was 12, Lawson was racing the local Southern California dirt track circuit.

    "We rode mainly at tracks like Corona and Ascot. I didn’t do very well for the first couple of years," admitted Lawson. "I just sort of rode around cautiously trying to not fall off my little 90cc Kawasaki Green Streak."

    It didn’t take Lawson long to get over his timidity. He quickly became one of the fastest young amateurs in Southern California during the early 1970s heyday of dirt track competition.

    Besides dirt track racing, Lawson also began to hit the local road races after his grandfather bought him a 50cc Italjet. He later graduated to a Yamaha RD350. This road racing experience would later prove to be very valuable for Lawson.

    By 1978, Lawson obtained his AMA expert license. He was riding Shell Thuett Yamahas, which were very fast for Yamaha dirt trackers, but were no match for the Harley-Davidsons that dominated dirt track racing. Lawson did manage to do decently on TT tracks. His best finish of his rookie expert season was fifth in the TT national at Santa Fe Speedway near Chicago.

    By 1979, it was becoming clear that Lawson was fighting an uphill battle on the dirt tracks, while just the opposite was happening at the road races. At 20, Lawson was already considered one of the top road racers in West Coast club racing. In 1979, he proved that he was a force to be reckoned with when he finished second to a young Freddie Spencer in the AMA 250 Grand Prix national at Sears Point Raceway in Sonoma, California. Lawson finished the season as the second-ranked rider behind Spencer in the AMA 250 GP series.

    While doing a made-for-television Superbikes event late in 1979, Lawson was invited to a Superbike tryout at Willow Springs Raceway by Kawasaki. Lawson set fast time in the tryout and was offered the ride.

    "It was really pretty fun to ride those old 1000cc Superbikes," Lawson recalls. "They were pretty heavy and had a lot of power and with the wide handlebars you could actually ride them a lot like a flat tracker, power-sliding out of the corners and everything."

    It did not take long for Lawson to get used to racing Superbikes. Lawson won his first Superbike national at Talladega, Alabama, in April of 1980. That season saw some epic battles between Lawson, Freddie Spencer and Wes Cooley. The season ended with Cooley winning the title in a controversial manner, with protests and counter-protests being filed between the Kawasaki and Suzuki Superbike teams. Cooley had to wait two months after the season to finally be awarded the championship. The same season, Lawson dominated the AMA 250 Grand Prix Series.

    The Superbike controversy at the end of 1980 just made Lawson more determined. He came back in 1981 and won the title after another great year of battling Honda and its top rider, Freddie Spencer. The Lawson/Spencer rivalry would go down as one of the best in the history of Superbike racing. During this period, AMA Superbike racing really came into prominence and started to replace the Formula One class in importance. Lawson again won the 250GP title in ’81. Lawson’s ’80 and ’81 championships marked the only times that Kawasaki would win the AMA 250 Grand Prix titles.

    Lawson's last full season of racing in the U.S. was 1982. Again, Lawson and Kawasaki held off a serious challenge from Honda, that year with Mike Baldwin, who finished second in the series. The Kawasaki KZ1000 had been raced in the AMA Superbike class since the first race in March of 1976, but hadn't won until the fifth race of the 1977 season. Reg Pridmore set the precedent for the domination of the class by Japanese bikes. Pridmore would go on to win the championship that year and also in '78.

    Until 1980, Kawasaki was content to let others, such as the Vetter and Racecrafters teams, race their bikes for them. Now they recruited a young rider named Eddie Lawson for a factory backed Superbike team. Another racer of great promise, Wayne Rainey, would later join the effort.

    Rob Muzzy would build and tune the bikes that Eddie Lawson rode to the championship in 1981. To commemorate the win, Kawasaki built "the most striking, most performance-ready street-legal Superbike ever. The brand-new 1982 Kawasaki KZ1000R Eddie Lawson Replica." (Quote from the KZ1000R brochure.)

    Based on the standard KZ1000J model, the R1 had the fuel tank, rear-set footpegs, oil cooler and wheels from the GPZ1100. A GPZ style fairing and lower handlebar were added along with a Kerker KR-series four-into-one header. Revised steering geometry and suspension improved the handling. The motor was unchanged. Motorcyclist Magazine got an ET of 11.56 from their test bike in1982. That may seem slow in comparison to today's 10 second 600's and ZX12's running mid-9's, but it was quite respectable at the time.

    If you had the urge to go even faster on an '82 Kawasaki, you could purchase the KZ1000S1. This was no replica--this was the real deal. For a mere ÂŁ8000 a ready-to-race Superbike could be in your driveway.

    At the crankshaft, the motor put out 136 horsepower compared to the 79 of the R1. Eddie Lawson's race bike was said to have 149 horsepower. Harnessing all this power was a braced swing arm and huge brakes attached to the Dymag magnesium rims.

    The power may have been harnessed, but it certainly wasn't tamed. These motorcycles were being ridden much faster and harder than their designers intended. The frames would twist and flex from the horsepower and cornering loads. It was common for the riders to be seen sliding the bikes around the turns. Rob Muzzy was quoted as saying," those bikes were like dirt-tracking on the pavement. You really had to muscle them around."

    This era was a turning point for Kawasaki, whose racing efforts in the 1970's had limited success. No longer would this be the case. To this day the green bikes are a force to be reckoned with, having a heritage of power and reliability
    Last edited by MIKER; 03-02-08 at 08:36 AM.

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    eddie lawson= legend, thanks mean for the info, some of the younger motorcycle fans need to gain the knolage from the past, not so much from the present. always remember legeneds of the like, fredy frith, john sertise, alastair king, dickie dale, mike hailwood, dorino serafini. all are legends of the TT, real street raceing.

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    Thumbs up

    ^^
    TT riders & the whole event is awesome ..

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    agred 7 fold.

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    http://kawasakitriplesworldwide.com/...ic.php?t=30291


    Just in case you guys wondered HOW we became GREEN !!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zammy! View Post
    http://kawasakitriplesworldwide.com/...ic.php?t=30291


    Just in case you guys wondered HOW we became GREEN !!!
    the link aint working ..

 

 

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